Tag Archive: Newcastle Cathedral

  1. An Evening with Archbishop Sentamu

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    We are delighted to announce that The Archbishop of York John Sentamu will be our guest speaker at Newcastle Cathedral on Friday 7 September 2018 at 7:30pm.

    Doors will open at 7:15pm.

    This prestigious event is free and open to all.

    Tickets are free but must be booked in advance. For tickets please visit: https://an-evening-with-archbishop-sentamu.eventbrite.co.uk. Unreserved seating in the Cathedral Nave is on a first come first served basis.

    We are sure this will be an important event, not merely for the Cathedral – but for the region – as Archbishop Sentamu gives us the benefit of his huge experience, talks around faith issues and invites questions from the audience. We very much hope that you will be able to join us.

    This event is part of Pathways: an exciting mission weekend, coming to the Diocese of Newcastle in September 2018. To read more about the Diocese of Newcastle’s Pathways Mission please visit: http://pathwaysmission.org.uk/

    We respectfully request that attendees refrain from using any devices or equipment for photography, video or audio recording during the evening. No large bags are permitted. No on-site parking is available.

    No media announcements will be made until nearer the time.

    For further information, please contact Catherine Mair, Head of Marketing and Communications at Newcastle Cathedral, by email: catherine.mair@stnicholascathedral.co.uk or telephone: 0191 232 1939.

    John Sentamu’s Biography

    John Tucker Mugabi Sentamu was born into Uganda’s Buffalo clan on the 10th June 1949.

    He is the sixth of thirteen children. Encouraged in his education by English missionaries and teachers, he graduated in law from Makerere University, Kampala and is an Advocate of the High Court of Uganda. He practised Law both at the Bar and at the Bench before he came to the UK in 1974.

    He read theology at Selwyn College Cambridge where he gained a Masters Degree and a Doctorate. He trained for ordination at Ridley Hall, Cambridge, then part of the Cambridge Federation of Theological Colleges. Following his ordination in 1979 he served as Assistant Chaplain at Selwyn College, Cambridge. From 1979-1982 he was Chaplain at HM Remand Centre Latchmere House and Curate of St Andrew’s, Ham in the Diocese of Southwark.

    From 1982-1983 he was Curate of St Paul’s Church, Herne Hill, in South London and from 1983-1984 Priest-in-Charge at Holy Trinity, Tulse Hill and Parish Priest of St Matthias Upper Tulse Hill. He then became Vicar of the joint benefice of Holy Trinity and St Matthias from 1984-1986. Between 1987 and 1989 he was also Priest-in-Charge of St Saviour Brixton Hill.

    He was appointed Bishop for Stepney in 1996, Bishop for Birmingham in 2002 and Archbishop of York in 2005. He is Primate of England and Metropolitan, a member of the House of Lords and a Privy Councillor.

    From 1997 to 1999, Dr Sentamu was Adviser to the Stephen Lawrence Judicial Inquiry and he chaired the Damilola Taylor Murder Review in 2002. He chaired the NHS Sickle Cell and Thalassaemia Screening Programme from 2001 to November 2013. He supported and advised workers affected by the closure of the Rover car plant in Birmingham and campaigned against guns, knives, drugs and gangs throughout the Midlands, after the killings of Charlene Ellis and Letisha Shakespeare and worked hard to ensure that their killers were brought to trial.

    Between 2002 and 2004 he was Chairman of the EC1 New Deal. He became President of Youth for Christ in 2004 and President of the YMCA in April 2005. In 2009, the Archbishop set up his Youth Trust and also launched his online charity Acts435 – for anyone who has need. In 2013, Dr John Sentamu, chaired an independent Commission on the future of the Living Wage; this followed from his work as Sponsor of the Fairness Commission in York.

    Dr Sentamu is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. His interests include music, cooking, reading, athletics, rugby and football. He is married to Margaret, and they have two grown-up children, Grace and Geoffrey and two grown-up foster children.

    Read more here: https://www.archbishopofyork.org/john-sentamu/john-sentamus-biography

    What are my transport/parking options for getting to and from the event?

    Newcastle Cathedral is within easy reach of many public transport links:

    RAILWAY
    Newcastle Central Train Station is just five minutes’ walk from Newcastle Cathedral. When leaving Central Station, turn right along Neville Street. You will pass by the monument to George Stephenson, father of Robert Stephenson, as well as The Literary and Philosophical Society and the North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers. Then follow Collingwood Street to bring you out at Newcastle Cathedral.

    CAR
    The nearest major public car park can be found on Dean Street. Walk out of the car park, cross straight over Dean Street and almost directly in front of you is a small stairway that brings you up into Amen Corner, at the back of the Cathedral. Follow the path left or right to approach the front entrance to the Cathedral. There are numerous other parking facilities, including multi-storey facilities and 48 surface car parks operated by Newcastle City Council. The Quayside’s multi-storey car park is approximately 12 minutes’ walk away and can hold up to 500 vehicles.

    PUBLIC TRANSPORT
    The Nexus operated Tyne and Wear Metro service operates into Newcastle city centre – with several stations in close proximity to Newcastle Cathedral. The nearest stations are Monument Station (at the top of the Grade I-listed Grey Street) and Central Station, both less than ten minutes’ walk away. If travelling from the Airport via Regent Centre, you will have to alight at Haymarket and change platforms.
    The Q1 QuayLink bus service runs to the bottom of the Side, the medieval Quayside street which leads up to the Cathedral. Public buses run outside of the Cathedral into Gateshead and towards Durham and Chester-le-Street once every 15 minutes (weekdays and Saturdays).

    ON FOOT
    From the city centre: Head down Grey Street, passing by the Theatre Royal. Turn right along Mosley Street, which will bring you out to the north facade of Newcastle Cathedral.
    From Central Station: As you leave Central Station, turn right along Neville Street. Following Collingwood Street will bring you to Newcastle Cathedral.
    From the Quayside: Alight the Side – the main medieval route into Newcastle. Alternatively, you can take Dog Leap Stairs. They’re steep but rise straight up to the Cathedral. The Castle Stairs are another route. These can be found on the Quayside, across the road from the Swing Bridge. Again, this is steep but will bring you to the Castle Keep. Keep forward along St Nicholas Street to approach the Cathedral on your right.

  2. Pride Eucharist and Free Film

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    The countdown is now on for Newcastle Pride 2018!

    Newcastle Cathedral is hosting its third PRIDE Eucharist – to which all LGBTQI+ folk, friends and allies are warmly invited at 4pm on Saturday 21st July, followed by a free film at 5pm (snacks & soft drinks available).

    PRIDE Eucharist will be a traditional Church of England service of Holy Communion, and an opportunity to worship the God who creates and calls every person into loving relationship.

    The Eucharist is then followed by a free film for all to enjoy – no spoilers allowed!

    All are very welcome to attend this free event.

    Newcastle Pride 2018 runs over three consecutive days from July 20th – 22nd.

    Newcastle Cathedral’s event is free to enter along with loads of other Pride 2018 events which also take place at Nuns Moor Park.

    The Pride lineup for this year include Saturday headliner Alexandra Burke, Sunday headliner S Club, Pop Idol’s Gareth Gates and BGT star Jamie Lee Harrison.

    Events on the Saturday and Sunday daytime of Pride are free entry. There will be evening concerts in the big top, featuring the likes of Steps and Vengaboys, but these are paid for ticketed events.

    There is also a parade again this year which will once again bring plenty of colour to Newcastle city centre on Saturday, July 21. Starting from the Civic Centre at noon and going down Northumberland Street before ending up at Nuns Moor.

  3. An Evening with Archbishop Sentamu

    Comments Off on An Evening with Archbishop Sentamu

    We are delighted to announce that The Archbishop of York John Sentamu will be our guest speaker at Newcastle Cathedral on Friday 7 September 2018 at 7:30pm.

    Doors will open at 7:15pm.

    This prestigious event is free and open to all.

    Tickets are free but must be booked in advance. For tickets please visit: https://an-evening-with-archbishop-sentamu.eventbrite.co.uk. Unreserved seating in the Cathedral Nave is on a first come first served basis.

    We are sure this will be an important event, not merely for the Cathedral – but for the region – as Archbishop Sentamu gives us the benefit of his huge experience, talks around faith issues and invites questions from the audience. We very much hope that you will be able to join us.

    This event is part of Pathways: an exciting mission weekend, coming to the Diocese of Newcastle in September 2018. To read more about the Diocese of Newcastle’s Pathways Mission please visit: http://pathwaysmission.org.uk/

    We respectfully request that attendees refrain from using any devices or equipment for photography, video or audio recording during the evening. No large bags are permitted. No on-site parking is available.

    No media announcements will be made until nearer the time.

    For further information, please contact Catherine Mair, Head of Marketing and Communications at Newcastle Cathedral, by email: catherine.mair@stnicholascathedral.co.uk or telephone: 0191 232 1939.

    John Sentamu’s Biography

    John Tucker Mugabi Sentamu was born into Uganda’s Buffalo clan on the 10th June 1949.

    He is the sixth of thirteen children. Encouraged in his education by English missionaries and teachers, he graduated in law from Makerere University, Kampala and is an Advocate of the High Court of Uganda. He practised Law both at the Bar and at the Bench before he came to the UK in 1974.

    He read theology at Selwyn College Cambridge where he gained a Masters Degree and a Doctorate. He trained for ordination at Ridley Hall, Cambridge, then part of the Cambridge Federation of Theological Colleges. Following his ordination in 1979 he served as Assistant Chaplain at Selwyn College, Cambridge. From 1979-1982 he was Chaplain at HM Remand Centre Latchmere House and Curate of St Andrew’s, Ham in the Diocese of Southwark.

    From 1982-1983 he was Curate of St Paul’s Church, Herne Hill, in South London and from 1983-1984 Priest-in-Charge at Holy Trinity, Tulse Hill and Parish Priest of St Matthias Upper Tulse Hill. He then became Vicar of the joint benefice of Holy Trinity and St Matthias from 1984-1986. Between 1987 and 1989 he was also Priest-in-Charge of St Saviour Brixton Hill.

    He was appointed Bishop for Stepney in 1996, Bishop for Birmingham in 2002 and Archbishop of York in 2005. He is Primate of England and Metropolitan, a member of the House of Lords and a Privy Councillor.

    From 1997 to 1999, Dr Sentamu was Adviser to the Stephen Lawrence Judicial Inquiry and he chaired the Damilola Taylor Murder Review in 2002. He chaired the NHS Sickle Cell and Thalassaemia Screening Programme from 2001 to November 2013. He supported and advised workers affected by the closure of the Rover car plant in Birmingham and campaigned against guns, knives, drugs and gangs throughout the Midlands, after the killings of Charlene Ellis and Letisha Shakespeare and worked hard to ensure that their killers were brought to trial.

    Between 2002 and 2004 he was Chairman of the EC1 New Deal. He became President of Youth for Christ in 2004 and President of the YMCA in April 2005. In 2009, the Archbishop set up his Youth Trust and also launched his online charity Acts435 – for anyone who has need. In 2013, Dr John Sentamu, chaired an independent Commission on the future of the Living Wage; this followed from his work as Sponsor of the Fairness Commission in York.

    Dr Sentamu is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. His interests include music, cooking, reading, athletics, rugby and football. He is married to Margaret, and they have two grown-up children, Grace and Geoffrey and two grown-up foster children.

    Read more here: https://www.archbishopofyork.org/john-sentamu/john-sentamus-biography

    What are my transport/parking options for getting to and from the event?

    Newcastle Cathedral is within easy reach of many public transport links:

    RAILWAY
    Newcastle Central Train Station is just five minutes’ walk from Newcastle Cathedral. When leaving Central Station, turn right along Neville Street. You will pass by the monument to George Stephenson, father of Robert Stephenson, as well as The Literary and Philosophical Society and the North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers. Then follow Collingwood Street to bring you out at Newcastle Cathedral.

    CAR
    The nearest major public car park can be found on Dean Street. Walk out of the car park, cross straight over Dean Street and almost directly in front of you is a small stairway that brings you up into Amen Corner, at the back of the Cathedral. Follow the path left or right to approach the front entrance to the Cathedral. There are numerous other parking facilities, including multi-storey facilities and 48 surface car parks operated by Newcastle City Council. The Quayside’s multi-storey car park is approximately 12 minutes’ walk away and can hold up to 500 vehicles.

    PUBLIC TRANSPORT
    The Nexus operated Tyne and Wear Metro service operates into Newcastle city centre – with several stations in close proximity to Newcastle Cathedral. The nearest stations are Monument Station (at the top of the Grade I-listed Grey Street) and Central Station, both less than ten minutes’ walk away. If travelling from the Airport via Regent Centre, you will have to alight at Haymarket and change platforms.
    The Q1 QuayLink bus service runs to the bottom of the Side, the medieval Quayside street which leads up to the Cathedral. Public buses run outside of the Cathedral into Gateshead and towards Durham and Chester-le-Street once every 15 minutes (weekdays and Saturdays).

    ON FOOT
    From the city centre: Head down Grey Street, passing by the Theatre Royal. Turn right along Mosley Street, which will bring you out to the north facade of Newcastle Cathedral.
    From Central Station: As you leave Central Station, turn right along Neville Street. Following Collingwood Street will bring you to Newcastle Cathedral.
    From the Quayside: Alight the Side – the main medieval route into Newcastle. Alternatively, you can take Dog Leap Stairs. They’re steep but rise straight up to the Cathedral. The Castle Stairs are another route. These can be found on the Quayside, across the road from the Swing Bridge. Again, this is steep but will bring you to the Castle Keep. Keep forward along St Nicholas Street to approach the Cathedral on your right.

  4. Newcastle Cathedral hosts its third PRIDE Eucharist and free film

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    The countdown is now on for Newcastle Pride 2018!

    Newcastle Cathedral is hosting its third PRIDE Eucharist – to which all LGBTQI+ folk, friends and allies are warmly invited at 4pm on Saturday 21st July, followed by a free film at 5pm (snacks & soft drinks available).

    PRIDE Eucharist will be a traditional Church of England service of Holy Communion, and an opportunity to worship the God who creates and calls every person into loving relationship.

    The Eucharist is then followed by a free film for all to enjoy – no spoilers allowed!

    All are very welcome to attend this free event.

    Newcastle Pride 2018 runs over three consecutive days from July 20th – 22nd.

    Newcastle Cathedral’s event is free to enter along with loads of other Pride 2018 events which also take place at Nuns Moor Park.

    The Pride lineup for this year include Saturday headliner Alexandra Burke, Sunday headliner S Club, Pop Idol’s Gareth Gates and BGT star Jamie Lee Harrison.

    Events on the Saturday and Sunday daytime of Pride are free entry. There will be evening concerts in the big top, featuring the likes of Steps and Vengaboys, but these are paid for ticketed events.

    There is also a parade again this year which will once again bring plenty of colour to Newcastle city centre on Saturday, July 21. Starting from the Civic Centre at noon and going down Northumberland Street before ending up at Nuns Moor.

  5. What does Newcastle Cathedral mean to you?

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    For over 900 years a house of worship has graced the heart of the city of Newcastle. Situated in historic ‘old’ Newcastle, Newcastle Cathedral stands as a beacon of hope for everyone visiting, working and living in and around the city: an open place of sanctuary, hospitality, welcome and worship for all those who wish to make it their home.

    Newcastle Cathedral is a remarkable building with a rich history and heritage. It is packed with monuments, ledger (tomb) stones and stained glass windows each telling stories of the real Newcastle and its fascinating people: magnificent testimonies to our glorious (and not so glorious) past and therefore inspiration for its future.

    Take a look at our new video to learn more!

     

    This is an extremely exciting time to be part of Newcastle Cathedral’s future as it progresses with its ambitious £6 million Heritage Lottery Funded Common Ground in Sacred Space project to transform the nave, renew visitor facilities and reshape external spaces. The work will reclaim the Cathedral’s historic role within the community, meeting the needs of new and diverse audiences including the marginalised and vulnerable, residents and tourists, and will ensure the Cathedral’s sustainability for many decades to come.

    We’d love to know “What does Newcastle Cathedral mean to you?” Join the conversation #MyCathedral #MyNewcastle, share on social media and tag us #MyCathedral #MyNewcastle @StNicNewcastle

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StNicNewcastle

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/stnicnewcastle

    Website: http://stnicholascathedral.co.uk/

    Will you play a part in our future? To find out more about Newcastle Cathedral and its Heritage Lottery Funded Common Ground in Sacred Space project, please contact the project team at CGISS@stnicholascathedral.co.uk or 0191 232 1939

  6. Repair fund helps Newcastle Cathedral prepare for First World War commemorations

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    A national scheme to conserve and repair England’s cathedrals, from which Newcastle Cathedral was awarded a total of £180,572 across two projects, has significantly reduced immediate risks, a report published today said.

    The £40 million First World War Centenary Cathedral Repairs Fund, launched by the Government in 2014, invited applications from Catholic and Church of England cathedrals to address urgent repair works. The fund prioritised making buildings weatherproof, safe and open to the public as well as ensuring they would be in a safe condition to host acts of remembrance for the centenary of the First World War armistice in 2018.

    Newcastle Cathedral’s grants have helped to secure the roof of the Thomlinson Library, a 1736 extension to the Cathedral by James Gibbs and enabled investigation of the damp in the Cathedral’s 14th century crypt and east end and its causes and remedies.

    Newcastle Cathedral Thomlinson Library (Photo Credit Purcell Architects)

    Newcastle Cathedral Crypt Space 1932 (Photo Credit Purcell Architects)

    Work to repair the library roof included replacement of lead and external timber, gutters, downpipes and masonry, together with security measures on the adjacent choir windows. The works were completed on schedule. Work to investigate the damp in the crypt included analysis of temperature and humidity readings in the crypt from the beginning of the monitoring to date, desk research on events in the immediate vicinity in recent years including various leaking drains, and an archaeological evaluation undertaken by Newcastle Cathedral Archaeologist, David Heslop.

    The completion of this work comes at an extremely exciting time for Newcastle Cathedral. Thanks to National Lottery players, the Cathedral can now progress with the initial stage of its ambitious Common Ground in Sacred Space project with a grant of £357,900 awarded by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) to develop a £6m scheme that will transform the nave, renew visitor facilities and reshape external spaces. The work will reclaim the Cathedral’s historic role within the community, meeting the needs of new and diverse audiences including the marginalised and vulnerable, residents and tourists, and will ensure the Cathedral’s sustainability for many decades to come.

    The Dean Elect of Newcastle, The Venerable Geoff Miller, said: “We are delighted with the work the WW1 Centenary Fund has supported. Our Thomlinson Library is now in good shape, with a watertight roof. Prior to the work the area required urgent attention; now there is no further work needed at present. In addition, although the cause of damp in the crypt has yet to be fully identified, the project has helped progress the analysis and the Cathedral Architect is currently monitoring the situation.

    The Venerable Geoff Miller continued: “Completion of this valuable work is timely. The Cathedral has been very generously supported by so many over the years and we are extremely grateful to the Fund for making initial transformative work possible. Now, with significant financial support from the HLF, Newcastle Cathedral will be able to move forward to the next level of regeneration and bring our exciting redevelopment plans to life.”

    In 2014, Newcastle Cathedral began a program of events and bell ringing to mark the loss of every Newcastle Guild of Bell Ringers who fell in the First World War. The current Newcastle Guild of Bell Ringers ring 100 tolls on the anniversary of each of those deaths. The four year-long bell ringing commemoration will culminate with a full peal nearer to Armistice Day 2018.

    England’s cathedrals contribute more than £220m to the economy each year, drawing in more than 11 million visitors. Each cathedral has the responsibility for raising the funds required for upkeep. However, with no regular Government funding, each cathedral faces an ongoing challenge to maintain their fabric while ensuring comfort, safety and accessibility for all.

    In total, of 146 awards were made to 57 cathedrals. Twelve cathedrals were awarded more than £1 million each, and the average award was £274,000. Grants were awarded over two phases between 2014 and 2018.

    Today’s independent report shows a significant reduction of problems requiring immediate repair as a result of the investment but warned that recipients all had outstanding repairs in areas not covered by the scheme.

    Grants were awarded by an independent panel chaired by Sir Paul Ruddock, a position appointed by the Secretary of State. The Fund was administered by the Church of England’s Cathedrals and Church Buildings Division (CCB) on behalf of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport, with the CCB praised in the report for cost efficiency and excellent communication.

    The report concluded that the fund had been successful in achieving its aims and met a funding need that could not be met elsewhere, adding that areas of cathedrals covered by grant-aided projects had been very largely changed from needing urgent repair to needing routine maintenance only.

    The Bishop of Worcester, Dr John Inge, the Church of England’s lead bishop for churches and cathedrals said: “Cathedrals such as Newcastle are at the forefront of the nation’s acts of remembrance each year, and have huge economic, spiritual and missional impact on their communities.

    “This fund has been an imaginative and welcome resource to ensure our cathedrals are fit for this commemoration, as well as underpinning the vital contributions they make to their communities.

    “It is vital that we do not stop here, and continue our commitment as a nation to protecting Newcastle and all England’s cathedrals for generations to come. We look forward to continuing a constructive dialogue with the Government around future funding collaborations.”

     

     

  7. Peace and Comfort – The Chicago Master Singers

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    PEACE AND COMFORT – a concert celebrating the triumph of resurrection, faith and hope

    Newcastle Cathedral
    Saturday 14 July 2018
    7.30pm

    featuring:

    Herbert Howells (Requiem)
    Ralph Vaughan Williams (Valiant for Truth)
    John Tavener (Song for Athene)
    Charles Villiers Stanford (When Mary thro’ the garden went)
    John Rutter (Cantate Domino)

    in a programme of music by British and American composers

    The Chicago Master Singers with Alan Heatherington, Conductor

    Tickets £10
    Concessions £8

    Available online from: http://www.wegottickets.com/event/434088 or on the door.

    The Chicago Master Singers (CMS) is one of the foremost choirs in the United States. Under the artistic direction of Alan Heatherington, the 100-strong choir performs an impressive array of sacred music, from Bach’s Magnificat and Mozart’s Requiem to the latest works by living composers.

    Today we are privileged to welcome the CMS to Newcastle Cathedral for a concert that marks the centenary of the end of World War 1. Their glorious programme focusses on the triumph of redemption, faith and hope, powerfully expressed in texts and music by some of the greatest English poets and composers of the period and always pointing to victory over death itself.

    The centrepiece of the concert is Herbert Howells’ magnificent Requiem, which is arguably one of the most beautiful and heart-wrenching works of sacred music written by any British composer, as well as pieces by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Richard Shephard, John Tavener, Philip Stopford, Kenneth Leighton, Charles Villiers Stanford, John Rutter and more.

    A concert not to be missed!

    In aid of Newcastle Cathedral, Church of St Nicholas.

     

  8. Choral Evensong – Selwyn College, Cambridge

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    Join us for Choral Evensong, led by the visiting choir from Selwyn College, Cambridge.

    A much loved service in the traditional language of the Book of Common Prayer, with a beautiful choral setting, psalms, canticles, anthem, and congregational hymns.

    Please come and sit in the Quire (the seats nearest the High Altar) where the service sheets and hymn books may be found – or if you prefer simply to listen, you are very welcome to sit in the pews.

  9. Evening Prayer

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    Join us at 5:30pm for half an hour of prayer and scripture readings in St George’s Chapel, off the North (left hand) Aisle of the Cathedral. All welcome.

  10. Ordination of Priests

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    The Ordination of Priests at Newcastle Cathedral